About

Christopher Wells presents The Luring a psychological thriller set in Vermont. Produced by Christopher Wells and Brian Berg.

LONGLINE: A man tries to recover a lost memory by returning to his family’s Vermont vacation home where an unspeakable act took place leaving him institutionalized as a child.

DIRECTORS STATEMENT: I believe that having a strong story built by compelling characters is the foundation of a successful movie. Also, I wanted to produce a film that has the elements I want to see in a thriller, such as: foreshadowing that is not obvious, accruing subtleties that keep me engaged, witty dialogue that sounds real and true, and an unpredictable story in which I can get lost.

When I attended SVA in the 90s, I remember seeing so many amazing ultra low budget films, which were being made in large numbers at the time. Today, along with my friend and Co-Producer Brian Berg, I wanted to return to fearless and brave movie making, and prove we could tell a compelling story on an ultra low budget.

Being creative means understanding what boundaries you are faced with - in our case the budget and the ability to still be creative and dynamic - and then figure out ways to reach beyond those restrictions.

It was also very important to have a strong cinematic element to The Luring and that vision was beautifully captured by Director of Photography Amanda McGrady, whose skill and enthusiasm lifted our film. I believe a great film must have scenes that show and don’t telegraph, and that was successfully executed by our editor, Lucas La Battaglia. In fact, everyone involved in the film contributed in some way that ultimately impacted the quality of the film. Surrounded by talented people whose input elevated my vision is something for which I will be forever grateful.

I set out to not only impress myself but to have other filmmakers tip their hat to my effort. I want to help to contribute to the field of filmmaking and demonstrate not only what I have learned, but as an artist, help to guide others. To learn, teach, and grow is the primary form of respect in my opinion, and I am not going to allow this moment to slip through my fingers.